And:
My hobbyhorse: Important newspaper removed its taboo on modern realism.
News: My work: in books, magazines, sites, exhibitions, art card, and as a finalist.

olieverf portret van Jeroen met glas wijn

Gezien van de Riet, Proost, tempera and oil on panel, 50x80cm.

It’s him!
With my beloved companion I like to go to the mountains. Out of many memories, this one kept coming back: ‘Cheers!’
I commissioned a portrait by myself. Yes, that look, that expression! I strove for the highest likeness, because that expression could easiliy get lost by the slightest stroke, especially at the corner of the mouth. And the rest was linked to that. Should the sweater be blue? No, a different color. The light? Should be softer. I made myself subservient to the painting, in order to achieve what I looked for. Now the painting is hanging in my workshop.

portret van Adolf van Gelder

J. Robert. Adolphe. Fils d Arnout Duc de Gueldres. Photo credit fr.wikipedia.org

You can liken a face to a rolling landscape. But beware of the folds to be too pronounced. Then you get lumps and bumps. ‘It’s him, but my, has he changed!’ used to be the sarcastic comment of my father-in-law in such occasions. He would certainly have made that remark about this portrait of Duke Adolph of Guelders.

Edvard Munch, Self portrait, 1882.

Edvard Munch, Self portrait, 1882. Photo credit: Meisterdrucke.nl

‘Pity’, I thought about this self-portrait by Edvard Munch (1863–1944). The delicate painting touched me, but that clear spot at the corner of the mouth seems like a little lump. Munch consciously freed himself from the classical tradition, but still: more freedom shouldn’t imply to leave such a lump on the face? It’s like a wart on a chin, you can’t stop looking at it.

Jeremy Lipking painted Skylar at 5

Jeremy Lipking, Skylar at 5, Olieverf op canvas, 25,4x20,3cm

A good likeness first of all requires precise form. That is defined by light and darkness. In your mind’s eye, colors should translate into tones of grey. It helps looking thru your eyelashes. A black and white photo of the painting-to-be can help even more. Jeremy Lipking is a master in that translation process. I once witnessed him mixing colors in a demonstration of portrait painting. He was able to achieve subtle transitions quickly and seemingly without effort, also in the warmer and cooler colors. (See also my Blog 2, on his demonstration of portrait painting).

Bertrand Desmaricaux schilderde Ange

Bertrand Desmaricaux, sketch after life, Ange, oil on linnen, 40x50cm

Whether you start with a detailed drawing, or with daubs, whether you work with fine or a broad touch, sharp obervation is in order. By precision I don’t mean very finely painted. Bertrand Desmaricaux makes a sketch from life, from the model Ange, who seems about to speak – you expect an ironic remark... Heart-warming colors, pride and elegance. Surely, Hegel couldn’t dissaprove of this? Soon more about Hegel.

René Tweehuysen painted Cannon-ball Man

René Tweehuysen, Cannon-ball Man, 2019, oil and tempera on linen, 100x75cm

Cannon-ball Man by René Tweehuysen, is ‘sure in form, with a loose touch’, with attention to the skin of an elderly man. Even the scar on his forehead is rendered carefully. The cannon-ball has a special meaning for the man. It makes this wonderful portrait unique.

Eh, the inner self
The philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1710–1831) saw this very differently. He got all worked up over ‘horribly resembling portraits’ – says Norbert Schneider in ‘The Art of the Portrait: Masterpieces of European Portrait-Painting, 1420–1670’. *)

portret van Hegel

Jacob Schlesinger, Portret van Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel. 1831. Photo credit: nl.wikipedia.org

Schneider continues, quoting Hegel:

'Painters should embellish the portrayed person and leave out all kinds of external elements, so that ‘they observe and recreate the general character and the lasting spiritual qualities of the subject’. According to this view, the spiritual character was the most important in a picture of a human being.' (Id.)

So the artist should embellish, and show the general character – was Hegel a Photoshopper avant la lettre? Beautiful women, all streamlined according tot the general character of current fashion?
Wait: Hegel also mentiones the spiritual character and lasting spiritual qualities. I could agree with that. However, without the ‘external elements’? Should we abjure realism? Really?
Hegel’s influence on the arts was and is vast. After more than two centuries his spirit still dwells among us. In my artistic youth I learned: ‘Don’t loose yourself in technique, that is dead and dumb. A good likeness of a portrait is not so much art as craft.’ That makes sense, I thought. After all, I wasn’t studing plumbing.
‘But there has to be a likeness’, I doubted, and that was of course all about ‘external elements’.
‘Yes, there has to be a likeness to the internal character’, used to be the reply. ‘That is the essence. You have to work magic thru your intuition and your artistic sensitivity.’

Kirchner, Selfportrait.

Kirchner, Selfportrait. Photo credit: Wikipedia.org

‘Look for the feeling behind the surface. Does that person feel red? Who is afraid of red? Fear, confusion? Don’t make it too smooth. Besides, who will know this woman or man in person, a hundred years from now? Think: it will still be a beautiful painting!’ Yes – that’s the sort of advice you would get a lot. It’s still going on. There are courses in ‘intuitive portrait painting’, where you ‘dig up something from yourself’. The portrayed person is just a booby. Anyway, you can’t blame Hagel for these modern ideas.
However compelling the expression of sentiment in the self-portrait by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (1880 -1938), it is clear that the external resemblance has been sacrificed to self-expression. That was not a problem for Kirchner. He resisted the classical tradition. Nevertheless, I can certainly appreciate his self-portrait, as an expression of his emotions.

Where is the miracle?
The emotions of another person really can be guessed from his or her exterior, up to a certain point.

Caravaggio painted Medusa

Caravaggio, Detail Medusa, diameter 48cm. Photo credit: Medusa Uffizi.it

Medusa’ appearance, as painted by Caravaggio (1571-1610), clearly shows her emotion of the moment.
Darwin was also interested in the emotions that show themselves in the expression of the face. They are extremely important in survival. Is there a present danger? How does that person look at me?

Paul Ekman: the Facial Action Coding

The interesting thing is: you can see feelings. How? They are muscles! The face has about fifty of them. Together, they can make a few thousand combinations. Behold:  there is the inner life appearing externally: anger, sadness, gladness. And the muscles around the mouth and the eyes create the finer nuances.
Mona Lisa’s famous smile is partly due to muscles in the cheeks, near the corners of the mouth. They are controlled by nerves, out of the brain – the feeelings, the inner life.
Here is the miracle.
The portrait painter observes and sees. The portrait comes to life!

Mere technique?
Pure technique is indispensable. For getting the proportions right, for example. That means ‘unfeeling’ measurement, seeing the subject in its abstract form. There are more of these basic techniques that have little to do with feeling.

proporties van het gezicht

Proporties van het gezicht. Zie hobbytekenen.nl

Portraits lacking feeling can also come about by being concerned only with measurements. Or by defective observation. When I looked again at one of my landscape painting from a while ago, I remarked to my alarm that I hadn’t noticed its flatness. And this, while I was at work outside, I was all caught up in the depth, the space... I was seeing the space, wasn’t I? Despite that observation in plein-air, I hadn’t noticed the flatness of the painting!
This reminds me of listening to music. It comes to you thru the ears. But can you really discern the combination of sounds? At any moment, and as a part of the whole? Some-one playing an instrument, especially an accomplished musician, can do that. So it is with painting. Observation and representation develop and refine themselves thru the years.

Yvonne`Melchers, Siena Palio XVI Aquila Eagle 1, oil on linen, 40x40cm

Besides, to see the nuances of feeling, the portrait painter herself needs sensibility. That is a personal quality, which is added tot the technique.
The recent colorful portrait Siena Palio by Yvonne Melchers, with a wonderful expression of matter, clearly exhibits emotions. You wonder what is going on in this young man’s mind. Is is mistrust, annoyance? Mixed feelings. You can’t be sure, just like in real life. This adds suspense to this lively portrait.

Art?
‘Where’s the art?’, is the question that is often put at well resembling and crafty portraits. There is the idea that the ‘free portrait’ is obviously art, and a craftful one is just ‘craft’. Certainly a well resembling portrait can be poor art, but the same goes for the ‘free portrait’. Or for a landscape, or a still life or any other genre for that matter.
So in the end it’s about the question: what is art? Great art, or not so great art? These are tricky questions, lots of nonsense have been said about them, and they lay outside the bounds of this article.

Frans Hals Portrait

Frans Hals, Portrait of Catharina Hooft and her wet-nurse, Ca 1620, Oil on canvas, 92x68cm. Photo credit nl.m.wikipedia.org

That a well resembling portrait is not automatically art, is an understandable view. In a landscape painting, the artist can move around trees and mountains for the sake of harmony, expression, beauty. Nobody will be the wiser: it’s just a question of applying the rules of art. That is how it transcends mere copying. The requirement of resemblance in a portrait however is much more compelling. And limiting. Precision can lead to freezing – but not necessarily so.

Frans Hals painted Malle Babbe

Frans Hals, Malle Babbe, Ca.1633-1635, Oil on canvas, 78,5x66,2cm. Photo credit: historiek.net

Frans Hals used to paint more freely when he wasn’t dealing with a commissioned portrait. Maybe we should call it a face or a genre piece in stead of a portrait. Anyhow, as the great artist he was, Hals was also able to make great art out of well resembling portraits. And what about Rembrandt...

Finally
An example of a free and ‘tied’ work is the phantasy-rich Byzantium by Julio Reyes

Julio Reyes painted Byzantium

Julio Reyes, Byzantium, 2020, Egg tempera and oil on copper, 28x29cm

 

detail Byzantium

He is exhibiting a wonderful play in this sublime painting with distemper and oil and goes a long way in free expression. At the same time it is true to form.

From this account you might deduce I am a dogmatic believer in realism. Should I point out that I am not? There are many roads that lead to Rome. Expressionism is one of many other approaches that one may enjoy, without being an in-depth psychologist. It makes no sense to apply the measuring-staff of realistic precision to more expressionist art. Neither does the other way round. One day this last form will speak for and from itself. It’s about the quality within a certain style.
I wanted to explain here that it is feasible to convey facial expressions by observing carefully the outer signals, where the facial muscles can reveal the inner life. A miracle of the human body!

*) Norbert Schneider, Portretschilderkunst. Meesterwerken uit de Europese portretschilderkunst 1420-1670, p.14.
**) Wikipedia, Medusa Murtola

My thanks to Jeremy Lipking, Yvonne Melchers, René Tweehuysen, Bertrand Desmaricaux and Julio Reyes for their permission to cite their work.
And thanks to Yvonne Melchers, Jeroen Strengers and Nico van Niekerk for their comments on the text.


My hobbyhorse
The stubborn taboo of De Volkskrant on modern realism is vanishing quietly. Sometimes there is even appreciation!  Surprisingly, Wieteke van Zeil wrote positively on Henk Helmantel, once called an objectionable traditionalist. She noted some children’s reactions:

 ‘Nevertheless, they hang around in front of the meditative painings of Henk Helmantel. I noted their gaze slowing down, as they underwent the atmosphere of the paintings. Such an atmosphere that film directors would consciously conserve, for their next movie.’

Volkskrant 30 oktober 2020


News
In 2020 till now, my work has been included in books, magazines, sites like Museum of Art, exhibitions (Møhlmann, MEAM), art-card; also as finalist in international competitions. See pages Home and other pages website.


Translation NL-EN: Jeroen Strengers


 

En:
Mijn stokpaardje: Hardnekkig taboe van De Volkskrant op realisme verdwijnt stilletjes
Nieuws: Mijn werk: in boeken, tijdschriften, sites, exposities, kunstkaart, en finales

olieverf portret van Jeroen met glas wijn

Gezien van de Riet, Proost, tempera and oil on panel, 50x80cm.

Het is ‘em!
Met mijn geliefde huisgenoot ga ik vaak de bergen in. Van de vele herinneringen liet deze
ene me niet los: Proost!
Ik gaf mezelf de opdracht voor een portret. Ja, de blik, de uitdrukking! Ik streefde naar zo groot mogelijke gelijkenis, want die uitdrukking verdween soms ineens door een miniem stipje, vooral bij de mondhoek. En ook de rest was er aan vastgeklonken. Blauwe trui? Andere kleur. Het licht? Zachter. Ik stelde me uiterst dienstbaar op om juist daardoor mijn zin te krijgen. Nu hangt het schilderij in mijn atelier.

portret van Adolf van Gelder

J. Robert. Adolphe. Fils d'Arnout Duc de Gueldres. Photo credit: fr.wikipedia.org

Een gezicht kun je zien als een landschap met glooiingen. O wee wanneer die te steil uitvallen. Dan krijg je builen en kuilen.
‘Het is ‘em, maar wat is t’ie veranderd!’ was dan het gevleugelde commentaar van mijn schoonvader. Zo’n sarcastische opmerking zou hij zeker hebben gemaakt over het bovenstaande portret van Hertog Adolph van Gelder.

Edvard Munch, Self portrait, 1882.

Edvard Munch, Self portrait, 1882. Photo credit: Meisterdrucke.nl

‘Jammer’ dacht ik bij het portret van Edvard Munch (1863-1944). Het gevoelige schilderij raakte me, maar dat kleine te lichte vlekje bij de mondhoek lijkt een bultje. Munch maakte zich bewust los van de klassieke traditie, echter, meer vrijheid betekende toch niet dat je zo’n bultje op het gezicht liet staan? Net een wrat op een kin, telkens moet je er naar kijken.

Jeremy Lipking painted Skylar at 5

Jeremy Lipking, Skylar at 5, Olieverf op canvas, 25,4x20,3cm

Voor gelijkenis is allereerst een precieze vorm noodzakelijk. Die wordt door licht en donker bepaald. Met het geestesoog worden kleuren vertaald naar hun grijswaarde. Door je oogharen kijken helpt. Een zwart-wit foto van het schilderij in wording helpt nog meer.
Jeremy Lipking is een meester in die vertaling. Ik heb hem eens kleuren zien mengen bij een demonstratie van portret schilderen. Subtiele overgangen bereikte hij snel en schijnbaar moeiteloos, ook in de warme en koele kleuren. (Zie ook mijn Blog 2, over zijn demonstratie portretschilderen).

Bertrand Desmaricaux schilderde Ange

Bertrand Desmaricaux, sketch after life, Ange, oil on linnen, 40x50cm

Of je nou eerst een uitgewerkte tekening maakt of met vlekken begint, met fijne of grove toets werkt, scherp kijken is het devies. Met precisie bedoel ik niet: heel fijn geschilderd.
Bertrand Desmaricaux maakte een schets, naar het leven, van model Ange. Gaat ze zometeen iets zeggen? Komt er een wat ironische opmerking? Hartverwarmende kleuren, trots en zwierigheid… Dit kán Hegel toch niet afkeuren? Straks meer over Hegel.

René Tweehuysen painted Cannon-ball Man

René Tweehuysen, Cannon-ball Man, 2019, oil and tempera on linen, 100x75cm

Cannon-ball Man van René Tweehuysen, is ‘vormvast met losse toets’, met aandacht voor de huid van een man op leeftijd. Zelfs de wond op het voorhoofd is weergegeven. De kanonskogel heeft een bijzondere betekenis voor de man. Het maakt dit prachtige portret uniek.

Eh, het innerlijk
De filosoof Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831) zag het helemaal anders. Hij wond zich op over 'tot aan het afschuwwekkende toe gelijkende portretten', aldus Norbert Schneider in ‘Portretschilderkunst. Meesterwerken uit de Europeseportretschilderkunst 1420-1670’. *)
Schneider vervolgt, Hegel citerend:

'Schilders dienden de afgebeelde mens te verfraaien en allerlei uiterlijkheden weg te laten zodat ze “van het onderwerp het algemene karakter en de blijvende geestelijke eigenschappen opmerkten en weergaven.” Volgens deze opvatting was het geestelijke karakter het belangrijkst in een afbeelding van de mens.' (Id.)

 

portret van Hegel

Jacob Schlesinger, Portret van Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel. 1831. Photo credit: nl.wikipedia.org

Dus de kunstenaar moest verfraaien, het algemene karakter tonen; was Hegel een Photoshopper avant la lettre? Mooie vrouwen, allemaal gestroomlijnd volgens het algemene karakter van de heersende mode?
Wacht, Hegel noemt ook het geestelijke karakter en blijvende geestelijke eigenschappen. Daar kan ik me wel in vinden. Echter, zonder uiterlijkheden? Realisme verafschuwen? Echt?
Hegel’s invloed op de beeldende kunst was en is groot. Na meer dan twee eeuwen is zijn geest nog steeds onder ons. In mijn schilderjeugd leerde ik al: ‘Verlies je niet in techniek, dat is doods, dom. Een goed gelijkend portret is niet zozeer kunst, alswel ambacht.’ Daar zit wat in, dacht ik toen. Per slot van rekening studeerde ik niet voor loodgieter.
‘Maar het moet ook lijken’, twijfelde ik, en dat sloeg natuurlijk op het uiterlijk.
‘Jawel, het moet lijken op het ínnerlijk’ was dan het antwoord. ‘Dat is de essentie. Tover met je intuïtie en kunstzin.'

Kirchner, Selfportrait.

Kirchner, Selfportrait. Photo credit: Wikipedia.org

'Zoek het gevoel achter het uiterlijk. Voelt die persoon rood aan? Who is afraid of red? Angst, verwarring? Maak het niet gladjes. Bovendien, wie kent over een eeuw die vrouw of man nog? En bedenk, een mooi schilderij blijft wel!’ Ja, dit soort advies kreeg je veel te horen.
Het gaat nu nog verder. Er zijn cursussen ‘intuïtief portret schilderen’, waar je ‘iets in jezelf naar boven haalt’. De geportretteerde zit er dan voor Piet Snot bij. Maar dit terzijde. Deze hedendaagse ideeën kunnen Hegel natuurlijk niet worden aangerekend.
Hoe dwingend de gevoelsontlading in het zelfportret van Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (1880 -1938) ook is, duidelijk is dat uiterlijke gelijkenis is opgeofferd aan zelfexpressie. Dat vond Kirchner geen probleem. Hij zette zich evenals Munch af tegen de klassieke traditie. Desalniettemin kan ik zijn zelfportret zeker waarderen, als uiting van zijn emoties.

Waar is het wonder?
De emoties van een ander zijn aan diens buitenkant tot op zekere hoogte wel degelijk te raden.

Caravaggio painted Medusa

Caravaggio, Detail Medusa, diameter 48cm. Photo credit: Medusa Uffizi.it

Het uiterlijk van Medusa, geschilderd door Caravaggio (1571-1610), toont duidelijk haar emotie van dat moment.
Darwin was al geïnteresseerd in emoties, die zichtbaar worden in de gelaatsexpressie. Die is van groot belang voor het overleven. Is er gevaar? Hoe kijkt die mens naar mij?

Paul Ekman developed Facial Action Coding System

Het bijzondere is: je kunt gevoelens zien. Hoe dat kan? Het zijn de spiertjes! Het gezicht heeft er ruim vijftig. Samen kunnen ze een paar duizend combinaties maken. Kijk, daar verschijnt het innerlijk leven in het uiterlijk: boosheid, verdriet, blijdschap. En de spiertjes rond mond en oog scheppen de fijnere nuances.
Mona Lisa’s beroemde glimlach berust mede op spieren in de wangen, vlak bij de mondhoeken. Ze zijn aangestuurd door zenuwen, vanuit de hersenen, het gevoel, het innerlijk.
Hier is het wonder.
De portrettist kijkt en ziet. Het portret komt tot leven!

Slechts techniek?
Pure techniek is onontbeerlijk. Komen tot de juiste proporties bijvoorbeeld. Dat is ‘gevoelloos’ meten, je ziet het onderwerp in abstracte gedaante. Zo zijn er meer basistechnieken te noemen die op zich weinig met gevoelens te maken hebben.

proporties van het gezicht

Proporties van het gezicht. Zie hobbytekenen.nl

Portretten zonder uitdrukking kunnen ontstaan door alleen maar gericht te zijn op de afmetingen. Of ook door gebrekkig te observeren. Toen ik een van mijn landschappen van een tijd terug bekeek, bemerkte ik tot mijn schrik dat ik de platheid ervan niet gezien had! Terwijl ik bij het schilderen, buiten, de mond vol had over diepte, ruimte... Ik zag daar de diepte immers! Ondanks die waarneming buiten was mij de platheid van het schilderij niet opgevallen!

Dit doet me denken aan muziek. Alles komt de oren binnen. Maar kun je de samenstelling van de klanken waarnemen? Per moment, en als deel van het geheel? Iemand die een instrument bespeelt, en vooral een bekwaam musicus, kan dat. Zo is het ook met schilderen. Het waarnemen en weergeven ontwikkelt en verfijnt zich met de jaren.

Yvonne`Melchers, Siena Palio XVI Aquila Eagle 1, oil on linen, 40x40cm

Bovendien, voor het zien van gevoelsnuances behoeft de portrettist zelf gevoeligheid. Die is toch ook weer persoonlijk en mengt zich met techniek.
Het recente, kleurrijke portret Siena Palio van Yvonne Melchers, met prachtige stofuitdrukking, toont duidelijk emoties. Je vraagt je af wat er in deze jongeman omgaat. Voelt hij wantrouwen, heeft hij de pest in? Gemengde gevoelens. Je weet het niet, en zo gaat het in het echt ook. Het maakt dit levendige portret extra spannend.

Kunst?
‘En de kunst?’ is de vraag die bij gelijkende en vakkundige portretten vaak wordt gesteld. Het idee bestaat dat het ‘vrije portret’ vanzelfsprekend kunst zou zijn, en een vakkundig portret niet, want dat zou slechts ‘ambachtelijk’ zijn. Zeker, een gelijkend portret kan als kunst pover zijn, echter, dat geldt net zo goed voor het ‘vrije portret’ . Of voor landschap, stilleven, welk onderwerp dan ook.
Het gaat dan eigenlijk om de vraag: wanneer is iets kunst? Grote kunst, of matige kunst? Heikele kwesties, er is veel gekkigheid over beweerd, en het valt buiten dit bestek.

Frans Hals Portrait

Frans Hals, Portrait of Catharina Hooft and her wet-nurse, Ca1620, Oil on canvas, 92x68cm

De opvatting,  dat een goed gelijkend portret niet zo maar kunst is, is wel begrijpelijk. In een landschap kan de kunstenaar bergen en bomen verplaatsen omwille van harmonie, uitdrukkingskracht, schoonheid. Geen haan die naar een exacte weergave kraait, omdat hier wetten van de kunst werden toegepast. Daardoor ontstijgt het aan de kopie. De eis van gelijkenis van een portret is echter dwingend. En remmend. Dan kan precisie tot bevriezing leiden, maar dat is geen wet van Meden en Perzen.

Frans Hals painted Malle Babbe

Frans Hals, Malle Babbe, Ca.1633-1635, Oil on canvas, 78,5x66,2cm. Photo credit: historiek.net

Frans Hals schilderde vrijer wanneer het geen portretopdracht betrof. Misschien moet je het dan eerder als gezicht of genrestuk benoemen in plaats van portret. Evengoed, als groot kunstenaar wist Hals ook zijn gelijkende portretten tot hoge kunst te verheffen. En wat te denken van Rembrandt…

Tot slot
Een voorbeeld van vrij en gebonden is het fantasierijke Byzantium van Julio Reyes.

Julio Reyes painted Byzantium

Julio Reyes, Byzantium, 2020, Egg tempera and oil on copper, 28x29cm.

 

detail Byzantium

Hij speelt in dit sublieme schilderij met tempera en olieverf op wonderbaarlijke wijze en gaat heel ver in vrije weergave. Tegelijkertijd blijft hij trouw aan de vorm.

Uit dit verhaal zou je kunnen opmaken dat ik een dogmatisch gelovige van realisme ben. Moet ik zeggen dat dat niet zo is? Vele wegen leiden naar Rome. Zo is expressionisme één van de vele andere benaderingen waar je van kunt genieten, zonder dieptepsycholoog te zijn.
Het heeft geen zin om de meetlat van realistische precisie te leggen op meer expressionistische kunst. En andersom evenmin. Op een dag gaat dit laatste nog eens vanzelf spreken. Het gaat om kwaliteit binnen een bepaalde stijl.
Ik wilde met dit verhaal aantonen dat je met realisme de gezichtsuitdrukking heel goed kunt weergeven, met goed kijken naar het uiterlijk, waar vooral spiertjes het innerlijk kunnen tonen.
Een wonder van het menselijk lichaam!

*) Norbert Schneider, Portretschilderkunst. Meesterwerken uit de Europese portretschilderkunst 1420-1670, p.14.

Met dank aan Jeremy Lipking, Yvonne Melchers, René Tweehuysen, Bertrand Desmaricaux en Julio Reyes voor het mogen plaatsen van hun werk.

Met dank aan Yvonne Melchers, Jeroen Strengers en Nico van Niekerk voor tekstcommentaar.


Mijn stokpaardje
Het hardnekkige taboe van De Volkskrant op hedendaags realisme verdwijnt stilletjes. Af en toe zelfs waardering! Wieteke van Zeil schreef over de expositie van Henk Helmantel in het Drents Museum in Oog voor detail: ‘Wat doen die kapotte drinkglazen op dat schilderij?’ (Vk 2021-01-02).
Het is een verrassend positief commentaar, via de reactie van kinderen:
“Toch bleven ze minstens anderhalf uur hangen bij de meditatieve schilderijen van Henk Helmantel. Ik zag hun blik vertragen, en hoe de sfeer van de schilderijen ze steeds meer beving. Zo’n sfeer die regisseurs zorgvuldig opslaan, voor een volgende film.”

Volkskrant 30 oktober 2020


Nieuws
In 2020 tot nu, kwam mijn werk in allerlei boeken, tijdschriften, sites (zoals Museum of Art), exposities (Møhlmann, MEAM), kunstkaart, en in finales van internationale competities. Zie pagina’s Home en andere van de website.

 

En:
Galería Artelibre, site en ‘twenty years, in 20x20’.
Kunstkaarten, kalender en agenda van Kunst Uitgeverij Bekking&Blitz


Ets van Dürer

Dürer, A Draftsman Making a Perspective Drawing of a Woman.jpg

Vooraf

In mei 2018 gaf ik een lezing, Imitation and Imagination, voor TRAC2018 (The Representational Art Conference) in Nederland, samen met Ernst van de Wetering, internationaal Rembrandt expert. Zijn bijdrage ging over Rembrandt en het onderscheiden van kwaliteit in de kunst. Hij vergeleek werken van Rembrandt met die van leerlingen. Zijn lezing was gebaseerd op:

A  CORPUS  OF  REMBRANDT  PAINTINGS  Volume  V  Chapter  IV  met de titel:  On  quality:  Comparative  remarks  on  the  function  of  Rembrandt’s  pictorial  mind  (pp.  283  –  310).  Freely  accessible  in  The  Rembrandt Database:

http://rembrandtdatabase.org/literature/corpus?tmpl=pdf&pdf=/images/corpus/CorpusRembrandt_5.pdf

 

Rembrandt, Abraham's sacrifice and Unknown, Abraham's sacrifice

Rembrandt, Abraham's sacrifice and
Unknown, Abraham's sacrifice

Mijn lezing betrof natuurgetrouw realisme, het spanningsveld tussen imitatie en verbeelding in de klassieke kunst, ook in zijn hedendaagse variant.
Naturalisme is een van de vele uitingen van realisme, eentje met een hoge graad van imitatie.
Een commentaar in facebook (28-10-2014) op een zeer realistisch schilderij spreekt boekdelen:

Huysman. Street in Utrecht i

Gerard Huysman. Utrecht, street in backlight, oil on panel, 2013

‘Ik kan niet begrijpen waarom een kunstenaar zo hard zou werken om een schilderij als dit te maken dat zoveel op een foto lijkt. Daar zijn camera’s voor. Ik zie hier de bedrevenheid van de kunstenaar, maar niet de ziel.’

Dit soort opinies hoor je vaak. Want zeg zelf: verdringt naturalisme niet de verbeelding? Exact! Geen ziel, geen artistieke creativteit! En daarover gaat deze discussie.
Ik ga de mening bestrijden dat verbeelding in het naturalisme ontbreekt.

 

Deel 1 van de lezing staat in mijn blog van augustus 2017 (zie Archief).
Deel 2 van Imitatie en Verbeelding volgt nu.

Kritische vragen
Bovengenoemde kritiek raakte toch aan mijn twijfels over eigen werk. Allerlei vragen lieten me jarenlang niet los:
● Is naturalistische kunst eigenlijk hetzelfde als kopiëren?
● Is het een lagere kunstvorm? Saai?
● Veel mensen houden van dit soort werk, maar dat betekent niet dat het relevante kunst is.
● Voegt het iets toe? Tenslotte is de echte wereld er al. Daar moet je iets mee doen, aan toevoegen.
● Moet je je persoonlijke gevoelens niet in je kunst leggen?

 

drawing I don't know any more

I don't know any more, pencil-eraser-paper

Goede kunst, wie beoordeelt dat?
Het hedendaagse realisme in Nederland bloeit nu al zo’n dertig jaar. Dat is heel bijzonder in Europa. Toch wordt doorgaans deze kunst nog steeds door de officiële kunstinstellingen en media genegeerd, of erger, verworpen. Na dertig jaar is dat heel vreemd. Een cultuurschat wordt zo aan het grotere publiek onthouden.

Februari dit jaar nog schreef Joyce Roodnat in de NRC over exposanten in Museum More, waaraan ook Henk Helmantel deelnam:

“Dick Ket lijkt een realist, maar eigenlijk valt hij bij de andere drie uit de toon, met zijn ostentatieve nieuwsgierigheid naar de abstracte kracht van kleuren en composities. Mankes en Verster attaqueren hun onderwerp eigengereid en in spagaat: ze verbeelden het steevast teder en heftig tegelijk. Henk Helmantel is daarentegen een zakelijke realist. Precisie is leidraad, gevoel wil hij er niet bij hebben. Dat houdt hij voor zichzelf.
Vergelijk deze vier kopstukken en je ziet dat het realisme gevaarlijk is. Virtuositeit is geboden. Maar ‘net een foto’ is géén compliment. ‘Net echt’ nog minder. De realistische kunstenaar moet bereid zijn zich bloot te geven, anders wordt zijn schilderij een plaatje.”1)

Henk Helmantel. Stillife with Cheese and Eggs

Henk Helmantel. Stillife with Cheese and Eggs, oil on panel, 1987, Collection Museum MORE. Photo Art Revisited.

Ik heb niets tegen persoonlijke gevoelens in de kunst. Het is een romantisch concept en er zijn prachtige romantische kunstwerken gemaakt. Maar er lijkt een consensus te bestaan dat persoonlijkheid, gevoelens van de kunstenaar altijd boven alles gaan, terwijl andere benaderingen uitgesloten worden of verworpen. Terwijl Helmantel zich richt op pure schoonheid, of in zijn eigen woorden, het hemelse.
Hoewel niet helemaal hetzelfde, doet het me denken aan Giorgio Vasari die erop wees dat naast imitatie en inventie goede kunst ook stijl en maniera moest bezitten, een persoonlijke artistieke elegante stijl.2) Het is waar: een eigen stijl voegt iets toe aan de kunst.

Goed, je zou kunnen zeggen dat mijn ontwikkeling tot nu toe precies de verkeerde kant op is gegaan. Zo’n twintig jaar geleden schilderde ik De schilderes en haar model, zie de afbeelding links. Rechts een recenter werk: Daphne. Het is gegaan van een losse toets, vrije kleuren en vrije verbeelding naar naturalisme. En naturalisme is minder gericht op stijl en handschrift.

Van de Riet, Drawing Model and Daphne

Gezien van de Riet. Left: Drawing her model, acryl/oil on linnen, 1996, and right: Daphne, oil on canvas, 2016

Ja, in mijn beginjaren experimenteerde ik veel en was mijn handschrift doorgaans zeer persoonlijk en spontaan. Werken van die periode zullen nooit versleten worden voor kopieën of foto’s. Waarom had ik in ’s hemels naam gekozen voor een meer natuurgetrouwe schildertrant? Dat heeft de zaken alleen maar gecompliceerd!
Het gekke was: ik kon er niks aan doen. Meer en meer wilde ik de schoonheid die ik zag vieren, die moest ik mij eigen maken.

De Oude Grieken
Zou het zo kunnen zijn dat de geschiedenis van de kunst al eerder discussies had meegemaakt over deze kwestie? Ik begon een zoektocht.
De Oude Grieken hadden grote waardering voor het naturalistische detail. Vogels moesten geschilderde druiven als echt zien en er op pikken. Een anekdote over Apelles illustreert duidelijk hun bewondering voor nabootsing. Het paard dat hij schilderde was zo levensecht, dat het paard van Alexander de Grote spontaan gehinnikt zou hebben toen hij het zag.

De Grieken hadden duidelijke opvattingen over verbeelding. De kunstenaar moest de platonische Idee voor ogen hebben, de volmaakte vorm, de bovennatuurlijke schoonheid van het object dat hij wilde weergeven. Dat kwam niet zomaar tot stand, want modellen waren slechts gewone stervelingen. Zelfs het mooiste menselijke lichaam kon dikke enkels hebben. Nou, in dat geval moest je de enkels van iemand anders nemen! Door zo te idealiseren zou de kunstenaar de pure nabootsing overstijgen.
Dus daar hebben we het: Imitatie en Verbeelding...

Aphrodite and Alexander as Hunter.jpg

After Praxiteles. Aphrodite, and After Lysippus. Alexander as hunter, both 4th century BC

Maar plotseling sprong ik overeind. Ik las over de beeldhouwer Lysippus, die werkte aan het hof van Alexander. Hij wilde overbrengen wat hij zag op een naturalistische manier! Niet door de bestaande, door de oude meesters ontwikkelde regels na te volgen over de volmaakte schoonheid, maar door zijn eigen waarneming. We weten weinig met zekerheid over Lysippus. Maar het aan hem toegeschreven beeld, Alexander de jager, toont zonneklaar een naturalistisch realisme. Nog altijd genieten ontelbare mensen er van.
Ik was blij met deze Lysippus.

1) Roodnat, Joyce. “Met drift geschilderde ‘kleine onderwerpen’ “. NRC, 2018-02-28.
2) Vasari, Giorgio. Lives of the Artists. Volume 1. Introduction by George Bull. London, 1987. p. 19-20.
Imitatie en Verbeelding gaat verder in de volgende blogs.


Galería Artelibre, ‘twenty years, in 20x20’

Galería Artelibre nodigde me uit om aan diens virtuele galerie deel te nemen, in de categorie ‘Grandes Autores’. Deze Spaanse galerie heeft kunstenaars op de site als Anders Zorn, Natalie Holland, David Kassan.

Galería Artelibre Artistas del mes

De galerie timmert al twintig jaar aan de weg voor realisme, op internationaal niveau. Dat steelt mijn hart! Om het twintigjarig bestaan te vieren komt er een expositie ‘Twenty years, in 20x20’, - alle werken van 20x20cm -, die verschillende steden in Spanje aandoet, waaronder Barcelona, in het MEAM, Museo Europeo de Arte Moderno. Mijn werk doet ook mee!

Link: http://artelibre.net/autor/27050


Kunstkaarten, kalender en agenda

Kunst uitgever Bekking&Blitz heeft agenda’s en kalenders voor 2019 uitgebracht. Mijn werk staat er ook in, tussen kunstenaars als Sorolla, Sargent, Kenne Grégoire.

Kunst weekalender en aganda's Bekking&Blitz

Kunst weekalender en aganda's Bekking&Blitz

In Brugge ontdekte ik een kunstkaart van mijn werk in het Groeningemuseum; ik mocht het niet fotograferen, maar toen ik het toch deed, draaide de beambte zijn hoofd even de andere kant op. Sympathiek!
In het Drents Museum zag ik ook een kunstkaart van mij, plus mijn boek. Stimulerend!

Het zijn de kleine dingen die het doen. Koopt u eens zo’n agenda, kalender, of kaart? Dan doet u mij een groot plezier! Het helpt de zo nodige naamsbekendheid.

Groeninge en Drents Museum cards and book Gezien van de Riet

Groeninge en Drents Museum cards and book

And:
Galería Artelibre, site and ‘twenty years, in 20x20’.
Kunstkaarten, kalender en agenda van Kunst Uitgeverij Bekking&Blitz


Dürer, A Draftsman Making a Perspective Drawing of a WomanIn May 2018 I gave a lecture, Imitation and Imagination, at TRAC2018 (The Representational Art Conference) in The Netherlands, together with Ernst van de Wetering, the world’s foremost authority on Rembrandt. His contribution was about Rembrandt and assessing quality. He compared works of Rembrandt with works of his pupils. His lecture  was  based  on:

A  CORPUS  OF  REMBRANDT  PAINTINGS  Volume  V  Chapter  IV  with  the  title:  On  quality:  Comparative  remarks  on  the  function  of  Rembrandt’s  pictorial  mind  (pp.  283  –  310).  Freely  accessible  in  The  Rembrandt  Database:

http://rembrandtdatabase.org/literature/corpus?tmpl=pdf&pdf=/images/corpus/CorpusRembrandt_5.pdf

Rembrandt, Abraham's sacrifice and Unknown, Abraham's sacrifice

Rembrandt, Abraham's sacrifice and
Unknown, Abraham's sacrifice

My lecture was on naturalistic realism, the area of tension between imitation and imagination in the classical art, including the contemporary variant.
Naturalism is one of many expressions of representational art, one with a very high degree of imitation.
See for example a comment with regard to a pretty realistic painting, on facebook (28-10-2014):

Huysman. Street in Utrecht i

Gerard Huysman. Utrecht, street in backlight, oil on panel, 2013

“I can’t understand why an artist would work so hard to make a painting like this that is so much like a photo. That’s what cameras are for. I can see the artist’s skill, but not the soul.”

 

This prejudice is often heard. Because really: isn’t imitation getting in the way of imagination? Exactly! No soul, no artistic creativity. And that’s what this discussion is all about.
I will contest the opinion that naturalism lacks imagination.

Part 1 of the lecture is in my earlier blog (see archive, august 2017).
Part 2 of Imitation and Imagination is following now.

However, the criticism does fit in with my doubts about my own work. For years I was haunted by questions:
● Is naturalistic realism actually the same as copying?
● Is it a lower form of art? Boring?
● A lot of people enjoy this kind of work, but that doesn’t mean it is relevant art.
● Does it add something? After all, reality, the real world, is already there. You should do something to it, with it.
● Shouldn’t you put your personal feelings into your art?

drawing I don't know any more

I don't know any more, pencil-eraser-paper

Good art, who judges?
Contemporary realism in the Netherlands has been flourishing for about thirty years now. This is exceptional in Europe. Nevertheless the official art institutions and the media mostly neglect its existence. After thirty years this is strange. The wider public is deprived of a cultural treasure.
Recently a journalist wrote in a prestigious Dutch newspaper that realism can be dangerous, in the context of great skill. Yes, virtuosity is a must, she writes, but the comment ‘It looks like a photo’ is not a compliment. ‘It looks like the real thing’ even less. The artist has to expose himself, otherwise his painting will be only an illustration, not more than a picture. She mentions Henk Helmantel, who said not to be in search for expressing his personal feelings.1 In her interpretation he is doomed to produce mere illustrations, far from high art.

Henk Helmantel. Stillife with Cheese and Eggs

Henk Helmantel. Stillife with Cheese and Eggs, oil on panel, 1987, Collection Museum MORE. Photo Art Revisited.

Nothing against personal feelings in art. It is a romantic concept and we have seen great romantic art. But there seems to be a consensus that the personality, the feelings of the artist are primordial, while other approaches are excluded or rejected.
Although it’s not quite the same, this reminds me of Giorgio Vasari who pointed out that besides imitation and invention, good art should possess style and maniera, a personal artistic elegant style.2 True, a style of one’s own will add something to the art.

Well, you could say that my development until now just seems to have taken the wrong direction. Some twenty years ago I made The painter and her model, see the picture on the left. On the right a recent work: Daphne. It went from a loose touch, free colors and free imagination to naturalism.
And naturalism is less focussed on style and handwriting.

Van de Riet, Drawing Model and Daphne

Gezien van de Riet. Left: Drawing her model, acryl/oil on linnen, 1996, and right: Daphne, oil on canvas, 2016

Yes, in my beginner’s years I experimented a lot and I often had a personal spontaneous handwriting. The works of that period will never be dubbed copies or photos. Why on earth did I choose a more naturalistic way of painting? It only complicated things!
The crazy thing was: I couldn’t help myself. More and more I wanted to celebrate the beauty I had seen, to make it my own.

Ancient Greeks
Could it be that the history of art had witnessed earlier discussions about this question? I started on a search.
The Ancient Greeks had a great appreciation of the naturalistic detail. Birds should see painted grapes as real and try to pick them. An anecdote about Apelles clearly illustrates their admiration for imitation. The horse he painted was so life-like, that it is said that the horse of Alexander the Great started whinnying spontaneously on seeing it.

The Greeks had clear views on imagination. The artist should have in mind the Platonic Idea, the perfect form, the supernatural beauty of the object he wanted to portray. This did not come about automatically, because models were only ordinary mortals. Even the most beautiful human body could have fat ankles. Well, in that case you would take somebody else’s ankles!
Idealizing thus, the artist would transcend pure imitation.
So there we have it: Imitation and Imagination...

Aphrodite and Alexander as Hunter.jpg

After Praxiteles. Aphrodite, and After Lysippus. Alexander as hunter, both 4th century BC

But suddenly I jumped up. I read about the sculptor Lysippus, who worked at Alexander’s court. He wanted to convey what he saw in a naturalistic manner! Not following the current rules for perfect beauty, developed by the old masters, but his own observation.
We don’t know much for sure about Lysippus. But the sculpture attributed to him, Alexander the hunter, clearly shows a naturalistic realism. Whoever made it, this artist was capable of far-reaching imitation.
I was happy about this Lysippus.

1) Roodnat, Joyce. “Met drift geschilderde ‘kleine onderwerpen’ “. NRC, 2018-02-28.
2) Vasari, Giorgio. Lives of the Artists. Volume 1. Introduction by George Bull. London, 1987. p. 19-20.
Imitation and Imagination will continue in the coming blogs.


Galería Artelibre ’20 years, in 20x20’

Galería Artelibre invited me to participate in its virtual gallery, in the category of Grandes Autores. This Spanish gallery has artists on its site like Anders Zorn, Natalie Holland, David Kassan.

Artelibre-artistas-del-mes

It is promoting realism internationally, already for twenty years, and that is heart-warming, I think! A special exhibition will celebrate their twenty years anniversary, “20 years, in 20x20” (all works will be 20x20cm). It will travel through Spain, and also visit MEAM, Museo Europeo de Arte Moderno, in Barcelona. My work will be part of it!

Link: http://artelibre.net/autor/27050


 

Calendar, diary, cards

Art editor Bekking&Blitz has published art diaries and calendars for 2019. A work of mine figures between artists like Sorolla, Sargent, Kenne Grégoire.

Kunst weekalender en aganda's Bekking&Blitz

Kunst weekalender en aganda's Bekking&Blitz

In Brugues I saw an art card of my work in the Groeningemuseum, but it was forbidden to take a photo of it. I explained that it was a work of mine, but no way. Still, I disobeyed and the officer kindly pretended not to see it.

Groeninge en Drents Museum cards and book Gezien van de Riet

Groeninge en Drents Museum cards and book

In the Drents Museum of Assen there was another art card, and my book. Stimulating! This helps the brand awareness. It’s the small things that count!

Translation NL-EN: Jeroen Strengers

linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram